daughterofdiaspora:

i appreciate people who take their time when they speak. who pause and think when they need to. who aren’t afraid of silence. it means that they are being intentional about what they are about to say. take your time, speaking too quickly can be dangerous. 

(via chocolatemuslimah)

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maplesuhtori:

*talking to white*
me: hey montgomery we’re friends right? can i ask you a question?
timothy: my name is actually chester but yes
me: why did you pass the chinese
exclusion act in 1882

(via mettaworldwar)

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america-wakiewakie:

It Turns Out Hamas Didn’t Kidnap and Kill the 3 Israeli Teens After All | NY Mag
When the bodies of three Israeli teenagers, kidnapped in the West Bank, were found late last month, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu did not mince words. “Hamas is responsible, and Hamas will pay,” he said, initiating a campaign that eventually escalated into the present conflict in the region. 
But now, officials admit the kidnappings were not Hamas’s handiwork after all. 
Non-plagiarizing BuzzFeed writer Sheera Frenkel was among the first to suggest that it was unlikely that Hamas was behind the deaths of Gilad Shaar, Naftali Frenkel, and Eyal Yifrach. Citing Palestinian sources and experts the field, Frenkel reported that kidnapping three Israeli teens would be a foolish move for Hamas. International experts told her it was likely the work of a local group, acting without concern for the repercussions: 

[Gershon Baskin] pointed out that Hamas has earlier this month signed an agreement to form a unity government with Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas, bridging, for the first time in seven years, the Palestinian leadership in the West Bank and Gaza.
“They will lose their reconciliation agreement with Abbas if they do take responsibility for [the kidnappings],” Baskin added.

Today, she was proven right:

After Israel’s top leadership exhaustively blamed Hamas for kidnap of 3 teens, they’ve now admitted killers were acting as “lone cell.”
— Sheera Frenkel (@sheeraf) 
July 25, 2014

Order of events: 3 teens kidnapped->100s of Palestns in WB arrested->revenge attacks on Palestinians->violence along Gaza/Israel border->war
— Sheera Frenkel (@sheeraf) 
July 25, 2014

To recap: 3 teens kidnapped->100s of Palestinians in WB arrested->revenge attacks on Palestinians->violence along Gaza/Israel border->war
— Sheera Frenkel (@sheeraf) 
July 25, 2014
Repeated inconsistencies in Israeli descriptions of the situation have sparked debate over whether Israel wanted to provoke Hamas into a confrontation. Israeli intelligence is also said to have known that the boys were dead shortly after they disappeared, but to have maintained public optimism about their safe return to beef up support from the Jewish diaspora. Writing for Al Jazeera, Musa al-Gharbi argued that Israel was deliberately provoking Hamas:

All the illegal and immoral actions related to Operation Brother’s Keeper were justified under the premise of finding and saving the missing teens whom the Israeli government knew to be dead — cynically exploiting the tragedy to whip up public outcry in order to provoke and then confront Hamas. This pattern of deception continues under the ongoing military offensive in Gaza. For example, last week in collaboration with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El Sisi and Abbas, in its efforts to alienate Hamas, Israel announced a bad-faith cease-fire proposal, which Hamas was not consulted on and never agreed to but whose violation supposedly justified Israel’s expansion and intensification of the military campaign into Gaza.

Despite continued negotiations, the violence shows no signs of letting up, and after Thursday night’s massive protests in the West Bank, there is still no ceasefire agreement. On Friday, it became clear that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s attempts to broker a seven-day truce were rejected by Israeli officials. Instead, Israel will apparently widen its ground operation in the Gaza Strip, despite international outcry about the civilian death toll. According to unnamed officials, the proposed truce was too generous to Hamas’s demands. 
Hamas, meanwhile, still hasn’t weighed in on the agreement, whose details are being kept secret, but continued to launch rockets into Israel. International peace talks are set to resume in France this weekend, and we’re keeping our fingers crossed.
(Photo Credit: Mohamed Farag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Anonymous: Don't you think Islam is too "extreme" that you can't even shake hands with the opposite gender?

musaafer:

No. 

But if you really wanna know what’s “extreme” (you don’t), I’ll have you know that it is pretty “extreme” to take a religious tradition with over 14 centuries of legal, philosophical, jurisprudential, exegetical, political, and societal thought, that has spread to just about every continent, that has come in contact with probably the majority of the world’s contemporary cultures, that has over a billion adherents in the world, that has at least five major schools of law, and that has an extraordinary capacity to be adaptable to space and time, and to reduce that tradition in its vast richness to one monolithic understanding of one arbitrary, useless issue. And while you’re at it, you can take your eurocentric understanding of what is “normal” behavior and shove it because if your primary concern with Islam is supposedly not being able to shake someone’s hand, your concern isn’t at all with the faith but with Otherizing and vilifying its adherents as ignorant followers of a religion that you, in your ignorance, have labeled as too extreme because it seemingly doesn’t conform to what you deem acceptable. 

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coffeewithajla:

I won’t say that “you broke me”. You’re not that powerful, I’m not that weak. You are not more powerful than my Lord who has promised me protection. You didn’t break me, you made me sad. And sadness passes. And my Lord is eternal.

(via theyteachlifesir)

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aaesha:

The intention of seeking knowledge should be for self betterment and being critical of your inner and outer self, not to impose it on others and being critical of them.

It is for you.

(via theyteachlifesir)

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"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything." -

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem, via theyteachlifesir)



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autisticlynx:

when privileged groups want rights, safety, and respect, it’s called “basic human decency”

when oppressed groups want rights, safety, and respect, it’s called “social justice”

(via theyteachlifesir)

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何.蒙娜